Think Bigger  

Think Bigger

Blog | December 8, 2016

Bigger is not always better, but bigger rarely goes unnoticed. For years, interior designers and collectors alike have been utilizing large works of art to impact space—a pop, an accent or a statement to an aesthetic. Sometimes it is the focal point of a room, giving a minimalist space one awe-inspiring feature. Other times it can act as a mural, enhancing an already richly decorated space.

Taking up physical space or reaching monumental scale has been a challenge and call to innovation for ages. Large paintings push the boundaries of materials, installation and technique. Scale can also disorient. Proportional to everything else around it, the idea of what large-scale is can even fluctuate. Regardless, content often becomes secondary to how the rest of our senses are impacted by large works of art in their own environments. The details in the grandness do not go unnoticed and a large-scale painting can become a disruption—demanding attention within a room.

Bigger can be bold and powerful and an exciting addition to any space, which is why we love the large-scale works that “disrupt” our gallery walls at Leslie Hindman Auctioneers. Here are a few of our favorites from the upcoming Post War and Contemporary Art auction on December 14.

Lot 46: Julian Schnabel, (American, b. 1951), Red Chief for Victor Hugo, 1982. 132 x 96 inches.
Lot 475: Jordan Davies, (American, b. 1941), # 4011, 1969. 76 x 91 inches.
Lot 74: Robert Lostutter, (American, b. 1939), Figure #2, c. 1965. 70 x 68 inches.
Lot 6: George Waite, (American, 1934-1994), Untitled. 68 1/2 x 53 inches.
Lot 1: David Budd, (American, 1927-1991), Obsidian Mirrors, 1969. 66 1/2 x 22 inches.
Lot 64: Terry Rodgers, (American, b. 1947), Whales. 41 x 135 inches.

Preview Times:

Saturday, December 10, 10am – 3pm
Sunday, December 11, 12pm – 4pm
Monday, December 12, 10am – 5pm
Tuesday, December 13, 10am – 5pm

Preview Location:

1338 West Lake Street
Chicago, Illinois 60607

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